Monday, August 6, 2012

A Woman's Right to Choose

Do you choose to be a victim? Sometimes someone selects you and attempts to “cull you from the heard”. Did you volunteer to be a victim? Probably not, but more often than not something told the mugger, rapist, murder that you were the one.

How do others see you? Do you walk with your head down? Do you avoid eye contact with people passing by? Are you blissfully swaying to your tunes or frantically texting as you are walking down the sidewalk? Are you juggling bags, purse, keys, phone and children making your way through a parking lot?


Is your head up, alert, looking around? Are you keys out and ready? Are you looking directly at the people around you, casually scanning 360 degrees so you know who is close to you?  If they are close enough for you to see their eyes clearly they are close enough to get to you, probably faster than you can react if you are not prepared.

To paraphrase Jeff Foxworthy, you might be a victim if;

·         You tolerate small incursions into your personal space without comment.

·         You watch the ground when you are walking.

·         You wait until you get to your car to get your keys out.

·         You have no awareness of who is around you.

·         You go through your day assuming all if fine, nothing will happen because you are a good person.

·         You think it is rude to ask someone to step back when they crowd you in a line or at the ATM.

It is your right to tell a stranger to take a step back, to meet the eyes of those around you, to stand tall, be strong and alert, to protect yourself and your family, to walk with a presence.

Only you can choose to be a victim. Stand tall, do everything to reduce the odds that you will be selected.

Stay Strong, Stay Safe


  1. Look them in the eye: My children learned the value of this lesson. We live in an area where they rode their bikes to & from the shopping centers. When waiting for a stoplight to cross the road, cars would inch close in an attempt to force them out of their lane. My instructions were to stop, sit up, turn around and look the driver straight in the eye, don't drop your gaze & continue staring until the driver stopped. My daughter came home & she was so elated and so empowered! "It worked mom"! She uses that lesson as needed in her life. :)